The magic prism an essay in the philosophy of language

But he says that they have often misconceived their critical project, treating it in ways that are technically focused and that miss the deeper implications of their revolutionary challenge.

Belief ascriptions seek to capture a genuine phenomenon, although in Aristotelian terms it is more of a potentiality rather than actuality: The limits of substitution within the context clause are not dictated by an entity -- a propositional content -- but vary according to the communicative situation.

Chapter 3 introduces two conflicting perspectives on language -- Cartesian and social. In oratio obliqua we may follow Kripke and Wettstein and distinguish speaker reference -- what A meant to refer to -- from semantic reference -- what A actually referred to.

His book is thus a unique attempt to combine a sophisticated historical and substantive discussion of reference with a loosely speaking Wittgensteinian perspective on language and philosophical problems.

Direct reference theorists are prone to reason as follows.

Get The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language PDF

An Essay in the Philosophy of Language Howard Wettstein An Essay in the Philosophy of Language Howard Wettstein Description The late 20th century saw great movement in the philosophy of language, often critical of the fathers of the subject-Gottlieb Frege and Bertrand Russell-but sometimes supportive of or even defensive about the work of the fathers.

Furthermore, he places Millianism in the context of his social-practice picture of language. The Magic Prism is intended for professional philosophers, graduate students, and upper division undergraduates.

In fact, however, he is making a false claim about Aristotle. Wettstein argues that Wittgenstein-a figure with whom the critics of Frege and Russell are typically unsympathetic-laid the foundation for much of what is really revolutionary in this late 20th century movement.

The Magic Prism is intended for professional philosophers, graduate students, and upper division undergraduates. In this book, Wettstein brings the non-specialist into the conversation especially in early chapters ; he also reconceives the debate in a way that avoids technical formulation.

An Essay in the Philosophy of Language Howard Wettstein An Essay in the Philosophy of Language Howard Wettstein Description The late 20th century saw great movement in the philosophy of language, often critical of the fathers of the subject--Gottlieb Frege and Bertrand Russell--but sometimes supportive of or even defensive about the work of the fathers.

But he says that they have often misconceived their critical project, treating it in ways that are technically focused and that miss the deeper implications of their revolutionary challenge.

But in fact it remains a subject for specialists, since the ideas are difficult and the mode of presentation is often fairly technical. Propositions are simply sayables and thinkables; and their identity is just as determinate as the explanations that speakers can proffer of what they are thinking or what they have said.

In this book, Wettstein brings the non-specialist into the conversation especially in early chapters ; he also reconceives the debate in a way that avoids technical formulation. The subject itself should be of great interest, since philosophy of language has functioned as a kind of foundation for much of 20th century philosophy.

For better or worse, however, this is a suggestion which Wettstein, along with the mature Frege, rejects. For one thing, he argues convincingly that failure of substitutivity cannot be explained away by appeal to Gricean conversational implicatures.

Both traditionalists and direct reference revolutionaries have tried to solve the familiar Fregean puzzles about identity statements, empty names, and belief ascriptions and the overarching puzzle of how it is possible for words to stand for things through ever more sophisticated and arcane theories.

Thirdly, even speakers who can uniquely and correctly identify Aristotle may not be able to say how they identify him on a particular occasion.

His main contention is that standard proponents of that revolution such as Donnellan, Kripke, Kaplan, and Perry still accept too much of the Fregean orthodoxy.

The subject itself should be of great interest, since philosophy of language has functioned as a kind of foundation for much of 20th century philosophy.

Wettstein also denies that it ascribes to A a dispositional mental state. And it is difficult to resist the conclusion that such a denial is possible only because any such bearer would have to satisfy certain conditions.

Both orthodox philosophers of mind and language and Wittgensteinians have much to learn from the result. It entreats us to accept a Wittgensteinian dissolution of the general problem of linguistic intentionality.

But he says that they have often misconceived their critical project, treating it in ways that are technically focused and that miss the deeper implications of their revolutionary challenge. According to Wettstein, the direct reference revolution needs to be radicalized.

First, speakers can refer to things of which they have no uniquely identifying description. Wettstein argues that Wittgenstein--a figure with whom the critics of Frege and Russell are typically unsympathetic--laid the foundation for much of what is really revolutionary in this late 20th century movement.

This is not to deny that there is explanatory work here for the sciences, which investigate the neurological preconditions of our linguistic abilities. Secondly, people can have mistaken ideas about the items they refer to. For socialized Millianism informative identity precipitates no such epicycles on epicycles.

The Magic Prism is intended for professional philosophers, graduate students, and upper division undergraduates. A believes that p if A would sincerely avow that p under suitable circumstances.

People, that is, use symbols to stand for things. At best it suggests a meta-linguistic account of that difference, namely that the former but not the latter sentence implicitly yet informatively declares two different names to have the same bearer.Howard Wettstein.

Professor Wettstein has written three books—The Significance of Religious Experience, The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language, and Has Semantics Rested On a Mistake?, and Other Essays. Additional info for The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language Example text All of this suggests that the informativeness puzzle was not the key to Frege’s adoption of his fundamental thesis that reference.

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language This book is a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way 5/5(1).

The late 20th century saw great movement in the philosophy of language, often critical of the fathers of the subject-Gottlieb Frege and Bertrand Russell-but sometimes supportive of (or even defensive about) the work of the fathers.

Howard Wettstein's sympathies lie with the critics. The Magic Prism An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language - Kindle edition by Howard Wettstein.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.5/5(1).

The late 20th century saw great movement in the philosophy of language, often critical of the fathers of the subject-Gottlieb Frege and Bertrand Russell-but sometimes supportive of (or even defensive about) the work of the fathers.

The Magic Prism

Howard Wettstein's sympathies lie with the critics. But he says that.

Download
The magic prism an essay in the philosophy of language
Rated 3/5 based on 100 review